Jurassic World (2015)

An Empire of Words

Without a shadow of a doubt, Jurassic Worldwas probably one of the highly anticipated films of the year (After Star Wars of course) and of course, for people it’s a nostalgia trip back to Isla Nublar.

In any case, if you’ve been living under a rock for the past six months,Jurassic Worldmakes the journey back to Isla Nublar after 22 years, but this time with the island becoming the fully operational park that John Hammond once dreamt. His dream now passed down to Simon Masrani (Irrfan Khan) who seems to care more about the animals and guests happiness, rather than the money that it’ll cost him.

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Zach and Gray (Nick Robinson and Ty Simpkins, respectively) are the vessels that transport us to the theme park Jurassic World to meet their aunt, Claire (Bryce Dallas Howard) the chief operator of the theme park. Shortly after, Claire mentions a…

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7 Days in Hell (2015)

An Empire of Words

I’ve seen a few sports documentaries before, mainly ESPN’s 30 for 30’s and I’ve seen a few mockumentaries. 7 Days in Hell showcases both sides of the coin, directed by Jake Szymanski and featuring Kit Harrington and Andy Samberg as the two subjects of the ‘documentary’.

This mockumentary is based on a fictional seven day marathon match between Aaron Williams and Charles Poole, that occurred during the 2001 Wimbledon Championships. The two characters aren’t cut from the same cloth either, Charles coming from privileged background, whereas Aaron coming from the streets and ending up in the care of the Williams family. Serena explains that they reversed The Blind Side and took this white kid and made him a tennis star. Aaron is the bad-boy of tennis, sporting an outrageous haircut whilst storming out of interviews is all familiar ground for Aaron Williams.

Charles Poole’s (Kit Harrington) story is different. At…

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The Running Woman

Great read

Put On Your Happy Face

In this post I share some details of the eating disorder that I had when I was a teenager. If you’re experiencing or recovering from an ED, please be aware that this may be a difficult post to read and proceed with caution. Thank you. 

At this very second, I feel joyful. I’m in the sort of mood that makes me want to run out into the street and start foxtrotting with the nearest lampost, hugging the local Big Issue vendor, and dashing into the M&S under our flat and scattering sheaths of tenners, while yellling “Percy Pigs are on me!”

This is because I have just been for a run.

I am not one of nature’s runners. I come from a long and perversely proud line of exercise refuseniks. My parents may have piled on the academic pressure, but I think it was a point of pride that I…

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Eight Ill-Advised Reasons for Getting Married

Hahaha no way …the shoulder thing though LMAO

The History of Love

What would you say makes the most solid foundation for a marriage? Trust? Financial security? The sort of profound and death-defying passion that would make Jack & Rose weep with envy? [let’s face it, they are the modern-day Romeo & Juliet, and I’m only moderately ashamed to admit it.]

It was in the latter half of the eighteenth century that the concept of marrying for love began to gain currency in the English popular mindset, and the younger generation expected a bit more say in who their partner might be. Inevitably, centuries of parental tyranny in these matters meant that alliances negotiated in terms of acreage and titles continued to sweep many reluctant couples to the altar.

Here, however, we have a brilliant print suggesting that many people cannot be trusted with such a momentous decision, giving a range of slightly less conventional – but still remarkably unwise – reasons for marriage. Take…

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A Good Man is Hard to Find (Plus, Grits!)

Empires, Cannibals, and Magic Fish Bones

It’s late, cold and I’m drinking Jefferson’s Kentucky Bourbon Very Small Batch.  Much spice and vanilla on the nose with citrus notes everywhere–green apples and rum in there as well.  Taste?  Very clean, refreshing, slightly sour with red-hot candy, anise, a bit of lemon, bit of grass, and cookie dough.

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A roll of nectar in the mouth, head tilts back, eyes close and the mind wanders to the past.  In this case, Flannery O’Connor’s insightful diagnosis of memory in her classic short story A Good Man Is Hard To Find.  Over the years, I’ve read and re-read this story, assigned it in various classes, and discussed with students its many aspects of the absurd, grotesque and violent.  The story also contemplates our relationship to memories and what might happen when the past shapes the present.  The following scene occurs halfway through the tale, and marks a turning point…

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Why Have Hobbies?

Inspired to find a hobby at this point.

Aunt Beulah

In a recent Peanuts cartoon, when Lucy told Charlie Brown she was thinking of starting some new hobbies, Charlie said, “That’s a good idea, Lucy. The people who get most out of life are those who really try to accomplish something.”

Looking appalled, Lucy replied: “ACCOMPLISH something? I thought we were just supposed to keep busy.”

In the past, I thought like Lucy. Viewing hobbies as busy work to fill my idle moments, I pursued decoupage, macramé, origami, tatting, and yodeling. Each endeavor enjoyed the same success as my wish to be 5’6”.Wreath

My search for a busy-work hobby peaked when I scoured fields and ponds for nuts, pinecones, grasses, and twigs, which I used to make Christmas wreaths. I gave these creations to loved ones, who exclaimed happily and hung them in their snug homes.

I had used liberal amounts of a smelly liquid adhesive to attach my found…

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Everthing under the sun